FOR FRESH RAW PRODUCE ONLY
COMPARISON CHART FOR BRIX READINGS

PLANT IDENTIFICATION POOR AVERAGE GOOD EXCEL
-LENT
  PLANT IDENTIFICATION POOR AVERAGE GOOD EXCEL
-LENT

Alfalfa

4 8 16 28+ Hot Peppers 4 6 8 10+
Apples (regular varieties) 6 10 14 18+ Kiwi fruit 8 12 14 18+
Apples (sweet varieties) 10 14 18 22+ Kohlrabi 6 8 10 12+
Apricots 6 12 16 20+ Kumquat 4 6 8 10+
Asparagus 2 8 11 15+ Lemons 4 6 8 12+
Avocados 4 6 8 10+ Lettuce 4 6 8 10+
Bananas 8 10 12 14+ Limes 4 6 8 12+
Beets 6 8 10 14+ Mangoes 4 6 10 14+
Bell peppers 4 6 8 12+ Nectarines 6 12 16 20+
Blueberries 6 8 12 15+ Onions (regular varieties) 4 6 8 12+
Broccoli 6 8 10 12+ Onions (sweet varieties) 6 8 10 16+
Cabbage 6 8 10 12+ Onions (green) 6 12 16 20+
Carrots 4 6 12 18+ Oranges 6 12 16 20+
Cantaloupe 8 12 14 16+ Papayas 6 10 18 22+
Casaba 8 10 12 14+ Parsley 4 6 8 10+
Cauliflower 4 6 8 10+ Peaches 6 12 16 20+
Celery 4 6 10 12+ Peanuts 4 6 8 10+
Cherries (sour varieties) 6 8 14 16+ Pears 6 12 16 20+
Cherries (sweet varieties) 10 16 20 25+ Pineapple 12 14 20 24+
Coconut 8 10 12 14+ Plums 6 12 16 20+
Corn stalks 4 8 14 20+ Potatoes 4 6 10 12+
Corn young 6 10 18 24+ Raisins 60 70 75 80+
Cow peas 4 6 10 12+ Raspberries 6 8 14 16+
Cucumbers 4 6 8 12+ Rutabagas 4 6 10 12+
Endive 4 6 8 10+ Spinach 4 6 8 12+
English peas 8 10 12 14+ Sorghum 6 10 22 30+
Escarole 4 6 8 10+ Squash 6 8 12 16+
Field peas 8 10 12 14+ Strawberries 6 10 14 16+
Grains 6 10 14 20+ Sweet Corn 6 8 18 24+
Grapes (regular varieties) 8 12 16 20+ Sweet potato 6 8 10 14+
Grapes (sweet varieties) 12 16 20 26+ Tomatoes 4 6 8 12+
Grapefruit 6 10 14 18+ Cherry Tomatoes 10 14 16 22+
Green beans 4 6 8 10+ Turnips 4 6 8 10+
Herbs (most) 4 6 8 12+ Watermelon 8 12 14 16+
Honeydew 8 10 12 14+ 1996 by David Pelley
Notes by Rex Harrill (12/24/2004):  Dave shared this chart with me in 1996 (after long discussion) with the understanding that it represented his personal consulting experiences only.  He made it clear that he would not defend it nor widely publicize it.  Essentially, the chart is a standard Reams chart with Dave's notations overlaid. He did this because he kept discovering higher values in the crops he managed.  In particular, he furthered chart science in that he split off "sweet" varieties from ordinary. He also wanted all readers to understand that "excellent" numbers are not maximum numbers.  That is why he wanted a "+" sign after every listed item.   Anyone who works with brix knows that there are hundreds, if not thousands, of types of fruit and vegetables not listed.  Consultants are encouraged to compile local data and prepare their own chart variations.